REVUE DU WEB / AVRIL & MAI 2020

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Chaque mois, le CLIC France sélectionne pour ses membres des articles parus sur la toile traitant de l’actualité de l’innovation et des technologies dans un contexte culturel et patrimonial. Certains de ces articles sont inclus dans la newsletter hebdomadaire réservée aux membres. Retrouvez ci-dessous, la revue du web intégrale d’avril et mai 2020, réservée aux membres du CLIC France.

CULTURE MONDE

Animal Crossing: New Horizons, 2020. Photo by Sarah Waldorf. Courtesy of J. Paul Getty Museum.

. Quand le Covid-19 fera son entrée au musée (Slate, 28/05/2020)

Alors que la pandémie a contraint les institutions culturelles du monde entier à fermer leurs portes, certaines s’affairent à collecter objets, photos et témoignages qui serviront à raconter son histoire.

Quel regard jettera notre descendance sur la période actuelle? Que retiendra l’histoire de ce printemps 2020 où plus de la moitié de la population mondiale était confinée? Quelles images, quels textes entreront dans les manuels scolaires de nos arrière-petits-enfants? Que viendra-t-on voir dans les futures expositions Covid-19? (article)

. Museums are losing millions every week but they are already working hard to preserve coronavirus artefacts (The Conversation, 06/05/2020)

The COVID-19 pandemic has no borders and has caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of citizens from countries across the globe. But this outbreak is not just having an effect on the societies of today, it is also impacting our past.

Cultural resources and heritage assets – from sites and monuments, historic gardens and parks, museums and galleries, to the intangible lifeways of traditional culture bearers – require ongoing safeguarding and maintenance in an overstretched world increasingly prone to major crises. (article)

. Coronavirus murals: inside the world of pandemic-inspired street art (The Conversation, 14/05/2020)

There is no aspect of life the COVID-19 pandemic has not affected – and many of us are finding that cultural events and art online are lacking something vibrant and “real”.

One notable exception is street artists and graffiti artists, who have been busy incorporating COVID-19 into their work. The most prominent of these pieces is Banksy’s homage to the NHS and nurses everywhere called “Game Changer”. It hangs in Southampton Hospital, and will eventually be auctioned off for the NHS. (article)

. After coronavirus: Global youth reveal that the social value of art has never mattered more (The Conversation, 14/05/2020)

Health and government officials around the globe are slowly and ever-so-tentatively moving to relax lockdowns due to coronavirus.

In Canada, where the possibility of health-care collapse seems to have been averted (for the time being), some are beginning to ask questions other than “when will the pandemic end?” Instead, they’re turning towards “how will we move forward?” (article)

. La pandémie a transformé «Le Cri» en œuvre virale – à nouveau (The Conversation, 29/05/2020)

Il existe peu d’œuvres d’art aussi emblématiques que Le Cri, de l’artiste norvégien Edvard Munch (1863-1944). Le tableau, qui montre un visage bouche ouverte, yeux écarquillés et deux mains posées sur les joues, est devenu un symbole quasi universel de choc et de peur existentielle. Les séries ou films des années 1990 Frissons ou Maman j’ai raté l’avion ont participé à sa popularité, tout comme l’emoji qui le représente😱. (article)

. Museums Are Finding New Ways to Connect with Art Lovers Online during Quarantine (artnews.com, 19/04/2020)

As the art world reels from the COVID-19 epidemic, institutions everywhere are doing their best to bridge the gap of social distancing with online initiatives. While galleries and fairs push online viewing rooms and virtual reality advancements to keep collectors engaged, museums face a very different set of challenges.

They are attempting to simulate not just the experience of viewing art, but also the sense of activism and belonging that museums can cultivate in their communities through innumerable activities and initiatives. Institutions all over the world are taking creative approaches to recreating the museum experience at home. (article)

. Coronavirus: as culture moves online, regional organisations need help bridging the digital divide (The Conversation, 07/04/2020)

Museums, galleries and artist collectives around the world are shutting their doors and moving online in response to coronavirus. But engaging with audiences online requires access, skills and investment.

My research with remote Aboriginal art centres in the Northern Territory and community museums in Victoria shows moving to digital can widen the gap between urban and regional organisations. (article)

. Recreating masterpieces at home? People have been doing it for centuries (The Conversation, 22/04/2020)

Famous paintings are flooding the internet – but not as we are accustomed to seeing them. These are not just reproductions. Literally coming to life, paintings are being re-enacted at home with art lovers posing their way into everything from Girl with a Pearl Earring to American Gothic.

Given social distancing, it’s not surprising portraits are the favoured genre. Being home-bound also means using what is available: a bath towel in the place of a luxurious Renaissance dress; pots and pans instead of medieval headgear; pets taking on surprising roles. (article)

. The importance of art in the time of coronavirus (The Conversation, 01/04/2020)

People are dying, critical resources are stretched, the very essence of our freedom is shrinking – and yet we are moved inward, to the vast inner space of our thoughts and imagination, a place we have perhaps neglected. Of all the necessities we now feel so keenly aware of, the arts and their contribution to our wellbeing is evident and, in some ways, central to coronavirus confinement for those of us locked in at home. For some, there are more pressing needs. But momentary joys, even in dire circumstances, often come through the arts and collective expression. (article)

. Grayson’s Art Club reminds us that creativity is an essential part of being human (The Conversation, 28/04/2020)
Made in less than four weeks from initial idea to broadcast, the first instalment of Grayson’s Art Club is testament to ceramicist Grayson Perry’s entrepreneurial spirit. Just one of many creative rapid responses to the COVID-19 crisis designed to engage us with art and culture, it sits alongside initiatives from Arts Council England’s £160 million emergency response package, museums and art fairs opening up their doors to virtual visitors, and shareable resources such as Michael Craig-Martin’s downloadable “Thank You NHS” poster, ready to be coloured in and posted in your window. (article)
. Lesson of the Day: ‘Now Virtual and in Video, Museum Websites Shake Off the Dust’ (NY Times, 30/04/2020)
As the coronavirus pandemic keeps arts institutions closed across the globe, museums are getting creative about presenting their work online and their websites are posting traffic numbers that were once unimaginable. The Musée du Louvre in Paris has reported a tenfold increase in web traffic: 400,000 visitors per day, from 40,000.

In this lesson, you will explore some of the world’s greatest museums and artistic treasures and consider the role of art in chaotic times. In a Going Further activity, you will respond to one artwork in depth. (article)

. Museums are losing millions every week but they are already working hard to preserve coronavirus artefacts (The Conversation, 06/05/2020)

The COVID-19 pandemic has no borders and has caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of citizens from countries across the globe. But this outbreak is not just having an effect on the societies of today, it is also impacting our past.

Cultural resources and heritage assets – from sites and monuments, historic gardens and parks, museums and galleries, to the intangible lifeways of traditional culture bearers – require ongoing safeguarding and maintenance in an overstretched world increasingly prone to major crises. Meanwhile, the heritage sector is already working hard to preserve the COVID-19 moment, predicting that future generations will need documentary evidence, photographic archives and artefacts to help them understand this period of history. (article)

. Museums in cyberspace (pursuit.unimelb.edu.au, 17/05/2020)

In the face of COVID-19, museums have moved to engage audiences online. Here are some lessons on what works and what doesn’t. The COVID-19 pandemic has been devastating for the cultural sector and museums, many of which have closed or suspended their local and international programs, including travelling exhibitions and international loans.

In response to the pandemic, museums are jumping into the digital ocean of online communications, trying to compensate for the loss of their social influence at a time when onsite exhibitions are impossible. As key actors of cultural diplomacy and soft power, the crisis poses vital questions for museums about their diplomatic commitments. Can museums sustain their efforts in international cultural relations and retain their global visibility when they are limited to the digital realm? (article)

. Museums Are Closed, But Digital Exhibitions Could Be A Revenue Source—If Only They Tried (Forbes, 06/04/2020)

As Easter approaches and the school year winds down, late spring would normally be the time that tourists begin pouring into Europe’s cultural capitals. But with the coronavirus crisis keeping local museum-goers at home and dashing travel plans for the foreseeable future, the economic outlook for museums doesn’t look good.

Many U.S. museums have had to lay-off and furlough staff, European museums have faced increased risk of theft and all will likely see donations dry up or flow to relief efforts elsewhere. (article)

. Has the digital museum finally come of age? (Apollo, 4/05/2020)

There is ferocious competition to jump into action. Museums and galleries worldwide are now poised to deliver virtual tours, artworks of the day, web seminars and discussions, social engagement and, especially in the US, online fundraising. Audiences are downloading this content at unprecedented levels, with many responding in creative ways: witness the hilarious responses to the Rijksmuseum and Getty Museum promoting challenges to recreate works of art with household items. The speed with which museums and audiences have adapted to this enforced shift from analogue operations to virtual activity is staggering. (article)

. Museums Have Moved Online, But They Must Reinvent Themselves to Thrive (artnews.com, 05/05/2020)

During the past month, museums across the globe have been faced with suddenly transforming themselves from physical spaces designed to immerse visitors in installations and on-site programs into producers and distributors of online multimedia content.

Without any preparation or playbook. Rather than deliver visitors to the museum, museums must now deliver themselves to the visitor. The medium is the museum. (article)

. Grayson’s Art Club reminds us that creativity is an essential part of being human (The Conversation, 28/04/2020)

Made in less than four weeks from initial idea to broadcast, the first instalment of Grayson’s Art Club is testament to ceramicist Grayson Perry’s entrepreneurial spirit. Just one of many creative rapid responses to the COVID-19 crisis designed to engage us with art and culture, it sits alongside initiatives from Arts Council England’s £160 million emergency response package, museums and art fairs opening up their doors to virtual visitors, and shareable resources such as Michael Craig-Martin’s downloadable “Thank You NHS” poster, ready to be coloured in and posted in your window.

Over his six-part series, Perry promises to help “battle the boredom” by taking us on a “journey of art discovery”. This journey will combine footage of the artist creating new work – in episode one, a portrait of his wife, psychotherapist Philippa Perry, on one of his trademark ceramic plates – with interviews with celebrity guests, contemporary artists. There are also paintings, sculptures and textiles sent in by the public, that will judged and curated in an end of series exhibition to archive the club’s creative responses. (article)

. Hard truths: will museums’ digital plans make curators obsolete? (artnews.com, 14/05/2020)

The museum where I work as a curator of prints and drawings instructed staff to work from home during the coronavirus lockdown. In a recent Zoom conference call, our director revealed that revenue had dropped to such an extent during our closure that the entire institution may be in peril.

He said that we need to recalibrate (he’s right), but then he went on about the immediate need for blockbuster shows and Instagrammable experiences to drive up future ticket sales. Our superb collection of works on paper is focused on prewar America, and while I can think of many wonderful exhibitions that could feature these works, if I’m being honest, none of them are barnstormers. (article)

. Are online viewing rooms the future of the art market? (Apollo, 08/05/2020)

Art Basel Hong Kong’s online viewing rooms initiative could not have been more timely. The digital platform had been in development for several months but was fast-tracked after the Hong Kong fair was cancelled in February due to the coronavirus outbreak. The organisers of the premier Asian fair quickly filled the gap with its new online facility, which was accessible to the public from 20–25 March (VIP access was granted two days earlier).

In total, 235 galleries – around 95 per cent of the fair’s original roster – showed more than 2,000 works, valued at a total of $270m according to Marc Spiegler, the global director of Art Basel’s fairs. The site, free of charge for galleries, offered basic options to view by artist, gallery, medium and price range. A zoom-in option to view works up close was available, while viewers could head down a rabbit hole and link through to other websites such as the video platform Vimeo for more content. (article)

. Coronavirus: as culture moves online, regional organisations need help bridging the digital divide (The Conversation, 07/04/2020)

Museums, galleries and artist collectives around the world are shutting their doors and moving online in response to coronavirus. But engaging with audiences online requires access, skills and investment. My research with remote Aboriginal art centres in the Northern Territory and community museums in Victoria (Australia) shows moving to digital can widen the gap between urban and regional organisations.

Local spaces are vital. They ensure our national story is about more than the metropolitan, allowing artists to create – and audiences to engage with – local art and history. These art centres and museums bring communities together. (article)

. Behind the screens – how museums and galleries are going virtual (Apollo, 09/04/2020)

Before Covid-19 many museums and galleries had begun to integrate digital platforms, but many more have seen that evolution accelerated by the global health crisis. Following the widespread closure of arts institutions, and with millions of people stuck indoors, the demand for virtual visits has ballooned. Take the Courtauld Gallery, which launched a virtual tour together with the Toronto-based imaging organisation Synthescape in 2009 and closed in September 2018 for refurbishment. Last year that tour was visited just under 9,000 times; during the lockdown, there were 14,600 visits in March alone. Two questions now arise: what does it take to create a digital programme? And will that programme still be of use when the lockdowns end?

One institution able to rely on pre-existing digital infrastructure is the British Museum. In 2015 it collaborated with Google Arts & Culture – the decade-old platform that today features material from some 2,000 museums and archives – to create a virtual tour of its galleries. A team from Google Street View pitched up out of hours and, over the course of about five days, walked a camera trolley through the building – crucially, with its face-blurring technology turned off. Last November the museum added virtual galleries to its own website: thematic selections of works, presented as photographs alongside text from curators, which focus on objects not usually on display. (article)

The Great Court of the British Museum on Google Street View

. #MuseumWeek: Celebrating Digital Museum Work in the Age of COVID-19 (aam-us.org, 01/05/2020)

#MuseumWeek was launched in France in 2014, thanks to a union between around seven hundred European museums who wanted to both strengthen their raison d’être and increase their audience in the digital space. It has since gained increasing international success, reaching seventy-five countries around the world in 2017. Since the first year, organizers have called it “the first worldwide cultural event on social media.”

#MuseumWeek is, quite literally, a hashtag for culture. Every year, museums, galleries, foundations, institutions, archives, and libraries from all over the world meet in the virtual space to prolong their missions on social networks and spread culture over the Internet. This great cultural machine is driven by professionals, artists, and information workers from every sphere. Though it is opened to all kinds of cultural institutions, most of the 6128 participants in the most recent edition were museums. (article)

. Going digital not easy for cultural institutions (theglobeandmail.com, 18/04/2020)

If you are restless these days, you could escape to a Group of Seven landscape beckoning from the website of the Art Gallery of Ontario or McMichael Canadian Art Collection. If the kids are hollering, you could distract them with dinosaurs and fossils available online courtesy of the Royal Ontario Museum or Royal B.C. Museum.

Forced to close by the coronavirus crisis, Canada’s museums and public art galleries quickly redirected visitors to their digital offerings: social-media feeds, 3-D gallery tours, videos of curators’ talks, online exhibitions and image banks of their collections. Virtual experiences beckon, yet the truth is that only a tiny fraction of Canada’s public collections can be seen online. (article)

. Art from home — 10 of the best virtual museum experiences in Europe (Chsrtie’s, 09/04/2020)

How the British Museum, the Louvre, the Uffizi and more are bringing their treasures into your home. (article)

CULTURE FRANCE

. Les musées post confinement : vers de nouvelles pratiques ? (The conversation, 13/05/2020)

Les musées ont fermé leurs portes dès le début de la crise sanitaire… mais ils savent en parallèle se rendre accessibles et démultiplient les initiatives originales, partout dans le monde. À toute heure, depuis notre canapé, dans la chambre, la salle de bain ou la cuisine, que nous soyons connaisseur, amateur d’art, geek, plus ou moins familier de ces institutions, nous sommes invités à découvrir un musée qui se réinvente en ligne. Les organisations muséales déroulent un véritable « fil d’Ariane » sur la toile en proposant des initiatives plurielles et protéiformes – concours, hashtag, jeux, atelier, vidéos ou encore visites virtuelles. (article)

. Public, financement, numérique : les nouveaux défis des musées en temps de Covid (franceculture.fr, 22/05/2020)

#MonMuséeDéconfiné |Tous les musées français n’ont pas rouvert avec la fin du confinement lié à la Covid-19. Pendant ces huit semaines, nombre d’entre eux ont gardé le lien avec le public en proposant des visites virtuelles ou des podcasts. Désormais, « petits » et grands musées réfléchissent à l’après-confinement. (article)

. Pendant le confinement, les musées ont accru leur audience avec des internautes plus lointains et plus jeunes (franceinter.fr, 19/05/2020)

Le confinement a provoqué la fermeture des musées, et ceux-ci ont rivalisé d’activités en ligne. Leurs efforts sur les réseaux sociaux a fini par payer, au-delà de leur public habituel. (article)

. Les musées post confinement : vers de nouvelles pratiques ? (The Conversation, 13/05/2020)

Les musées ont fermé leurs portes dès le début de la crise sanitaire… mais ils savent en parallèle se rendre accessibles et démultiplient les initiatives originales, partout dans le monde. À toute heure, depuis notre canapé, dans la chambre, la salle de bain ou la cuisine, que nous soyons connaisseur, amateur d’art, geek, plus ou moins familier de ces institutions, nous sommes invités à découvrir un musée qui se réinvente en ligne.

Les organisations muséales déroulent un véritable « fil d’Ariane » sur la toile en proposant des initiatives plurielles et protéiformes – concours, hashtag, jeux, atelier, vidéos ou encore visites virtuelles. Depuis le début de la crise sanitaire inédite que traverse le monde, les institutions muséales débordent d’inventivité et investissent les réseaux socionumériques (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube) pour proposer de nouvelles manières de vivre l’expérience muséale. (article)

TECHNOLOGIE

. Étude sur l’usage d’Internet, des réseaux sociaux et du mobile au 1er trimestre 2020 (BDM, 27/04/2020)

4,57 milliards d’internautes, 3,81 milliards d’utilisateurs des réseaux sociaux, 5,16 milliards de mobinautes… Hootsuite et We Are Social ont mis à jour leur grande étude annuelle sur l’usage du web, des réseaux sociaux et du mobile au cours du 1er trimestre 2020. (Article)

. Chiffres TikTok : un réseau social en pleine expansion ! (leptidigital.fr, 22/04/2020)

SOURCES: presse

 

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